OV Watch

At work we have what we call The Giveaway Table. I love love love The Giveaway Table.

About two weeks ago I strolled by and saw the pink and tan box of The OV Watch sitting there. At the time, I didn’t even register what I was seeing, exactly, but I saw the word “ovulation” and thought I’d grab it. No one was around. Not that it’s a secret that I ovulate, but I’m not interested in sharing my pregnancy efforts with the office.

So has anyone seen the commercial for The OV Watch? I’d seen it a few times and had the same conversation with myself every time:
Me: I should buy that.
Me: Dude, it’s like $300
Me: So are you saying you wouldn’t pay $300 to be pregnant?
Me: No, I’m saying I don’t want to fall prey to expensive desperation grabs.
Me: But you don’t know, that thing might work.
Me: That’s right, I don’t know. So I’m not going to spend the money.

But if one drops in my lap, I’m certainly going to wear it.

And sure enough, it did.

The jury is out on whether or not it works. It’s definitely taking readings and giving me fertility indications. But whether or not it’s just an expensive Magic 8 Ball remains to be seen. I expect to talk to my doctor this week and I’ll ask her opinion. What she says will help determine whether I order more sensors, as the giveaway watch only came with one.

I hope it works. For obvious reasons. But also because I’ve been harboring a fear that I’m not ovulating. The literature says the watch stays on the “Not Fertile” reading all month long if there’s no ovulation. And I’m already on “Fertile Day 2.” My body is also telling me it’s Go Week again, so I’m at least optimistic that it’s possible if not that it will definitely happen.

The “Not Fertile” reading is cracking me up. It’s right there in big block letters across the front of the watch face. Which, I think, is something they may want to reconsider in their phase two designs. Because, really, that’s a bit harsh. Even if it is true. We can assume that by the time a woman is wearing this thing she’s already had some trouble. Does she really need that judgment hovering there, visible at all times?

On the alternate route, I’ve done more adoption research. I’m considering setting up a consultation with Jane Aronson, who’s an international adoption expert/pediatrician. (Hey, she’s Angelina’s pediatrician so she’s got to be good, right?). She’s expensive, but not totally out of reach.

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30 responses to this post.

  1. So you’re wearing long sleeves to cover it? Or is it not a 24-hour a day thing that could change quickly?
    I can imagine that it would grow tiresome having people wonder (sometimes out loud) “so, are you pregnant yet?”

    Reply

  2. So you’re wearing long sleeves to cover it? Or is it not a 24-hour a day thing that could change quickly?
    I can imagine that it would grow tiresome having people wonder (sometimes out loud) “so, are you pregnant yet?”

    Reply

    • At first I thought I had to wear it all the time and was wondering whether I’d be able to contrive a reason for long sleeves in July. But the watch only needs to be worn six hours a day to get all the readings it needs. So I just pop it on before I go to bed and take it off before I get into the shower.

      Reply

      • That’s good to know. Because I was thinking if you have to wear it all day every day, then it should at least be passable as a regular watch.

      • That’s good to know. Because I was thinking if you have to wear it all day every day, then it should at least be passable as a regular watch.

    • At first I thought I had to wear it all the time and was wondering whether I’d be able to contrive a reason for long sleeves in July. But the watch only needs to be worn six hours a day to get all the readings it needs. So I just pop it on before I go to bed and take it off before I get into the shower.

      Reply

  3. So you’re wearing long sleeves to cover it? Or is it not a 24-hour a day thing that could change quickly?
    I can imagine that it would grow tiresome having people wonder (sometimes out loud) “so, are you pregnant yet?”

    Reply

  4. At first I thought I had to wear it all the time and was wondering whether I’d be able to contrive a reason for long sleeves in July. But the watch only needs to be worn six hours a day to get all the readings it needs. So I just pop it on before I go to bed and take it off before I get into the shower.

    Reply

  5. That’s good to know. Because I was thinking if you have to wear it all day every day, then it should at least be passable as a regular watch.

    Reply

  6. I hope it works.
    I’m also curious about HOW it works, because if it is using BBTs I thought you had to take those first thing in the morning for accuracy, but if you wear it for six hours then it must be more calibrated for duration. I’m talking to myself. Sorry.
    Unless low sperm count is the problem, take advantage of every one of those fertility days. And one more for good measure. I was actually really surprised when I started doing FAM and realized that while you CAN get pregnant any time, it’s actually much more precision timing than I had ever realized.
    Honestly, your “not fertile” comment sounds like something from a novel. Like it’s accusatory or something.

    Reply

  7. I hope it works.
    I’m also curious about HOW it works, because if it is using BBTs I thought you had to take those first thing in the morning for accuracy, but if you wear it for six hours then it must be more calibrated for duration. I’m talking to myself. Sorry.
    Unless low sperm count is the problem, take advantage of every one of those fertility days. And one more for good measure. I was actually really surprised when I started doing FAM and realized that while you CAN get pregnant any time, it’s actually much more precision timing than I had ever realized.
    Honestly, your “not fertile” comment sounds like something from a novel. Like it’s accusatory or something.

    Reply

    • I mean, the watch is accusatory, not you.

      Reply

      • Totally. Although I am accusatory myself sometimes as well.
        I wish I could program the screen so I could take it all the way and make it say somthing like: Not Fertile, Loser.

      • Totally. Although I am accusatory myself sometimes as well.
        I wish I could program the screen so I could take it all the way and make it say somthing like: Not Fertile, Loser.

    • I mean, the watch is accusatory, not you.

      Reply

    • I know, the “NOT FERTILE” is cracking me up. But I am glad to get a break from it, as I’m currently on “FERTILE DAY FOUR.”
      Here is how it claims to work, taken from the web site:
      During a woman’s cycle, there is a surge of chloride ion levels that is expected about 6 days BEFORE ovulation. This surge comes about four days before the estrogen surge and approximately five days before the LH surge, making it an earlier predictor of ovulation than any other chemical surge during the month… When on the wrist, OV-Watch® measures the users changes in their sodium chloride ion levels that are secreted in their perspiration every 30 minutes and records up to 12 readings per period. This is the reason why OV-Watch® should be worn a total of six hours while sleeping. OV-Watch® can be worn more than six hours, however, a maximum of 12 readings will be taken in any day so that one day is not weighted more than another day. OV-Watch® is guided by a sophisticated software program that, based on individual conditions, predicts the beginning of a 6- day fertility window at the right time each cycle. Once the chloride surge has ended, OV-Watch® will guide you through your “fertile window” – the four most fertile days prior to ovulation (Fertile Day 1 through 4) and the time during ovulation (Ovulation Day 1 and 2). See graph above for full detail. After the Ovulation period, OV-Watch® will report two additional “Less Fertile days” after which OV-Watch® will report “Not Fertile”.
      So, whether or not this is total hokum is beyond my ability to judge.
      But we’re taking advantage of what time and temperature tells us is the right time anyway. I get lots of emphatic “every day” advice and lots of emphatic “every other day” advice. Being the diplomat I am, I’ve split the difference and told Damon his presence is requested every 36 hours this week.

      Reply

    • I know, the “NOT FERTILE” is cracking me up. But I am glad to get a break from it, as I’m currently on “FERTILE DAY FOUR.”
      Here is how it claims to work, taken from the web site:
      During a woman’s cycle, there is a surge of chloride ion levels that is expected about 6 days BEFORE ovulation. This surge comes about four days before the estrogen surge and approximately five days before the LH surge, making it an earlier predictor of ovulation than any other chemical surge during the month… When on the wrist, OV-Watch® measures the users changes in their sodium chloride ion levels that are secreted in their perspiration every 30 minutes and records up to 12 readings per period. This is the reason why OV-Watch® should be worn a total of six hours while sleeping. OV-Watch® can be worn more than six hours, however, a maximum of 12 readings will be taken in any day so that one day is not weighted more than another day. OV-Watch® is guided by a sophisticated software program that, based on individual conditions, predicts the beginning of a 6- day fertility window at the right time each cycle. Once the chloride surge has ended, OV-Watch® will guide you through your “fertile window” – the four most fertile days prior to ovulation (Fertile Day 1 through 4) and the time during ovulation (Ovulation Day 1 and 2). See graph above for full detail. After the Ovulation period, OV-Watch® will report two additional “Less Fertile days” after which OV-Watch® will report “Not Fertile”.
      So, whether or not this is total hokum is beyond my ability to judge.
      But we’re taking advantage of what time and temperature tells us is the right time anyway. I get lots of emphatic “every day” advice and lots of emphatic “every other day” advice. Being the diplomat I am, I’ve split the difference and told Damon his presence is requested every 36 hours this week.

      Reply

  8. I hope it works.
    I’m also curious about HOW it works, because if it is using BBTs I thought you had to take those first thing in the morning for accuracy, but if you wear it for six hours then it must be more calibrated for duration. I’m talking to myself. Sorry.
    Unless low sperm count is the problem, take advantage of every one of those fertility days. And one more for good measure. I was actually really surprised when I started doing FAM and realized that while you CAN get pregnant any time, it’s actually much more precision timing than I had ever realized.
    Honestly, your “not fertile” comment sounds like something from a novel. Like it’s accusatory or something.

    Reply

  9. I mean, the watch is accusatory, not you.

    Reply

  10. Now I’m curious – how does it work? How does it know?
    Crazy technology.

    Reply

  11. Now I’m curious – how does it work? How does it know?
    Crazy technology.

    Reply

  12. Now I’m curious – how does it work? How does it know?
    Crazy technology.

    Reply

  13. I know, the “NOT FERTILE” is cracking me up. But I am glad to get a break from it, as I’m currently on “FERTILE DAY FOUR.”
    Here is how it claims to work, taken from the web site:
    During a woman’s cycle, there is a surge of chloride ion levels that is expected about 6 days BEFORE ovulation. This surge comes about four days before the estrogen surge and approximately five days before the LH surge, making it an earlier predictor of ovulation than any other chemical surge during the month… When on the wrist, OV-Watch® measures the users changes in their sodium chloride ion levels that are secreted in their perspiration every 30 minutes and records up to 12 readings per period. This is the reason why OV-Watch® should be worn a total of six hours while sleeping. OV-Watch® can be worn more than six hours, however, a maximum of 12 readings will be taken in any day so that one day is not weighted more than another day. OV-Watch® is guided by a sophisticated software program that, based on individual conditions, predicts the beginning of a 6- day fertility window at the right time each cycle. Once the chloride surge has ended, OV-Watch® will guide you through your “fertile window” – the four most fertile days prior to ovulation (Fertile Day 1 through 4) and the time during ovulation (Ovulation Day 1 and 2). See graph above for full detail. After the Ovulation period, OV-Watch® will report two additional “Less Fertile days” after which OV-Watch® will report “Not Fertile”.
    So, whether or not this is total hokum is beyond my ability to judge.
    But we’re taking advantage of what time and temperature tells us is the right time anyway. I get lots of emphatic “every day” advice and lots of emphatic “every other day” advice. Being the diplomat I am, I’ve split the difference and told Damon his presence is requested every 36 hours this week.

    Reply

  14. Check out my answer to Lyzosy above, for the full techno-scoop.

    Reply

  15. Totally. Although I am accusatory myself sometimes as well.
    I wish I could program the screen so I could take it all the way and make it say somthing like: Not Fertile, Loser.

    Reply

  16. I’ve split the difference and told Damon his presence is requested every 36 hours this week.
    Ha!

    Reply

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