Quick Question

Can anyone recommend a book on money management for beginners? (ie: This is a 401(k), this is a Roth IRA, etc)

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20 responses to this post.

  1. R. will have exact titles – but in the meantime, visit fool.com.

    Reply

  2. R. will have exact titles – but in the meantime, visit fool.com.

    Reply

    • Second that – fool.com covers pretty much all the basics you need to know, and about.com covers the rest, albeit annoyingly with large inset advertisements.

      Reply

      • Thirded. The personal finance section has articles on just about everything, including, for instance, 401(k) vs. IRA vs. Roth IRA vs. etc., etc.
        However, if you, like me, like to read a linear book rather than bopping around randomly on a website, then The Motley Fool Personal Finance Workbook is a good overview and planning tool.
        Though I’ve not read her myself, Suze Orman’s books are very popular and well regarded.
        Rich Dad, Poor Dad is probably the most controversial personal finance book you can buy… detractors call the author a huckster charlatan, advocates call the author a huckster charlatan with really good ideas. Probably more inspirational than useful, unless you plan to (allegedly) live in a car while starting your real estate business.
        The Richest Man in Bablyon is also more inspirational than useful; In my Book Log entry, I mention that I wish I had read this instead of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series. ‘Course, you can just read the book log entry for a synopsis and save $10, thereby getting a headstart on your financial plan.

      • Thirded. The personal finance section has articles on just about everything, including, for instance, 401(k) vs. IRA vs. Roth IRA vs. etc., etc.
        However, if you, like me, like to read a linear book rather than bopping around randomly on a website, then The Motley Fool Personal Finance Workbook is a good overview and planning tool.
        Though I’ve not read her myself, Suze Orman’s books are very popular and well regarded.
        Rich Dad, Poor Dad is probably the most controversial personal finance book you can buy… detractors call the author a huckster charlatan, advocates call the author a huckster charlatan with really good ideas. Probably more inspirational than useful, unless you plan to (allegedly) live in a car while starting your real estate business.
        The Richest Man in Bablyon is also more inspirational than useful; In my Book Log entry, I mention that I wish I had read this instead of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series. ‘Course, you can just read the book log entry for a synopsis and save $10, thereby getting a headstart on your financial plan.

      • Thirded. The personal finance section has articles on just about everything, including, for instance, 401(k) vs. IRA vs. Roth IRA vs. etc., etc.
        However, if you, like me, like to read a linear book rather than bopping around randomly on a website, then The Motley Fool Personal Finance Workbook is a good overview and planning tool.
        Though I’ve not read her myself, Suze Orman’s books are very popular and well regarded.
        Rich Dad, Poor Dad is probably the most controversial personal finance book you can buy… detractors call the author a huckster charlatan, advocates call the author a huckster charlatan with really good ideas. Probably more inspirational than useful, unless you plan to (allegedly) live in a car while starting your real estate business.
        The Richest Man in Bablyon is also more inspirational than useful; In my Book Log entry, I mention that I wish I had read this instead of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series. ‘Course, you can just read the book log entry for a synopsis and save $10, thereby getting a headstart on your financial plan.

    • Second that – fool.com covers pretty much all the basics you need to know, and about.com covers the rest, albeit annoyingly with large inset advertisements.

      Reply

    • Second that – fool.com covers pretty much all the basics you need to know, and about.com covers the rest, albeit annoyingly with large inset advertisements.

      Reply

  3. R. will have exact titles – but in the meantime, visit fool.com.

    Reply

  4. R. will have exact titles – but in the meantime, visit fool.com.

    Reply

  5. Second that – fool.com covers pretty much all the basics you need to know, and about.com covers the rest, albeit annoyingly with large inset advertisements.

    Reply

  6. Thirded. The personal finance section has articles on just about everything, including, for instance, 401(k) vs. IRA vs. Roth IRA vs. etc., etc.
    However, if you, like me, like to read a linear book rather than bopping around randomly on a website, then The Motley Fool Personal Finance Workbook is a good overview and planning tool.
    Though I’ve not read her myself, Suze Orman’s books are very popular and well regarded.
    Rich Dad, Poor Dad is probably the most controversial personal finance book you can buy… detractors call the author a huckster charlatan, advocates call the author a huckster charlatan with really good ideas. Probably more inspirational than useful, unless you plan to (allegedly) live in a car while starting your real estate business.
    The Richest Man in Bablyon is also more inspirational than useful; In my Book Log entry, I mention that I wish I had read this instead of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series. ‘Course, you can just read the book log entry for a synopsis and save $10, thereby getting a headstart on your financial plan.

    Reply

  7. In addition to the Motley Fool series of books, there are also books like Personal Finance for Dummies which serve as a suitable primer for getting a grasp of the subject from a beginner’s perspective.
    Earlier this year, I bought that book and a Motley Fool book aimed at teenagers and young adults for my goddaughter when she turned 18 and became old enough to take control of her trust fund from her mother’s estate. I had nightmares about her being bilked out of her money by charlatans preying upon her youth and lack of money experience.
    She liked the books well enough to look for similar books at the library.

    Reply

  8. In addition to the Motley Fool series of books, there are also books like Personal Finance for Dummies which serve as a suitable primer for getting a grasp of the subject from a beginner’s perspective.
    Earlier this year, I bought that book and a Motley Fool book aimed at teenagers and young adults for my goddaughter when she turned 18 and became old enough to take control of her trust fund from her mother’s estate. I had nightmares about her being bilked out of her money by charlatans preying upon her youth and lack of money experience.
    She liked the books well enough to look for similar books at the library.

    Reply

  9. In addition to the Motley Fool series of books, there are also books like Personal Finance for Dummies which serve as a suitable primer for getting a grasp of the subject from a beginner’s perspective.
    Earlier this year, I bought that book and a Motley Fool book aimed at teenagers and young adults for my goddaughter when she turned 18 and became old enough to take control of her trust fund from her mother’s estate. I had nightmares about her being bilked out of her money by charlatans preying upon her youth and lack of money experience.
    She liked the books well enough to look for similar books at the library.

    Reply

  10. In addition to the Motley Fool series of books, there are also books like Personal Finance for Dummies which serve as a suitable primer for getting a grasp of the subject from a beginner’s perspective.
    Earlier this year, I bought that book and a Motley Fool book aimed at teenagers and young adults for my goddaughter when she turned 18 and became old enough to take control of her trust fund from her mother’s estate. I had nightmares about her being bilked out of her money by charlatans preying upon her youth and lack of money experience.
    She liked the books well enough to look for similar books at the library.

    Reply

  11. Thanks to all for the good recommendations!

    Reply

  12. Thanks to all for the good recommendations!

    Reply

  13. Thanks to all for the good recommendations!

    Reply

  14. Thanks to all for the good recommendations!

    Reply

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