Hubris

Last week I was swanning around like Lady Bountiful. I was an overflowing fountain, so abundantly blessed with milk that I was ready to provide for children other than my own. My son’s cheeks are so resplendent, he is ripe like a berry. I had a moral obligation to share. I was feeling pretty good about myself.

And suddenly, rapidly, my supply started to bottom out.

In the course of five days I went from reliably banking 14 ounces each day at work to barely squeaking out 6. At the same time, Alden graduated from eating 9 or 10 ounces while I was at work to guzzling down about 15. You can guess what I see happening in my freezer.

I’m drinking enough water to irrigate Atlanta. I brought my pump home this weekend so I can sneak in a few sessions between feedings. I will nurse that baby if he so much as glances chestward. We’ve also started him on a little bit of rice cereal each day. So far it’s not enough to make a dent in his appetite, but I want him to have time to adjust comfortably.

A few things to note: [If you don’t want to see my flowery language morph into something more clinical, now is the time to skip to the next post.]

1. I might have a mild case of thrush. It’s not clear. There’s no visible evidence. But I’ve got a bit of discomfort on one side that may be an indicator. I’m asking my local drugstore to order some gentian violet, just in case.

2. It’s been a little stressful around life these days. I’m sure I don’t need to say more.

3. There are some hormonal changes going on. I’ve been breaking out a little bit. I haven’t gotten my period back yet, but am starting to wonder if I will soon.

I want to nurse this baby for a minimum of one year. Any and all thoughts and suggestions are welcome.

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168 responses to this post.

  1. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

  2. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

    • No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
      Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
      I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
      The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
      More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

      Reply

      • It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
        Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
        Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

      • Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

      • That’s great to hear!
        Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
        You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

      • We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
        1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
        2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
        3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
        That last one never fails to make me laugh.

      • We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
        1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
        2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
        3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
        That last one never fails to make me laugh.

      • We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
        1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
        2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
        3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
        That last one never fails to make me laugh.

      • We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
        1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
        2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
        3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
        That last one never fails to make me laugh.

      • We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
        1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
        2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
        3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
        That last one never fails to make me laugh.

      • We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
        1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
        2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
        3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
        That last one never fails to make me laugh.

      • That’s great to hear!
        Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
        You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

      • That’s great to hear!
        Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
        You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

      • That’s great to hear!
        Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
        You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

      • That’s great to hear!
        Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
        You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

      • That’s great to hear!
        Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
        You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

      • Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

      • Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

      • Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

      • Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

      • Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

      • We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

      • Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

      • Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

      • Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

      • Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

      • Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

      • Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

      • We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

      • We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

      • We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

      • We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

      • We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

      • Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

      • Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

      • One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

      • While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

      • While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

      • While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

      • While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

      • While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

      • While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

      • One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

      • One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

      • One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

      • One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

      • One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

      • Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

      • Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

      • Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

      • Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

      • Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

      • Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

      • Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

      • Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

      • Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

      • Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

      • It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
        Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
        Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

      • It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
        Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
        Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

      • It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
        Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
        Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

      • It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
        Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
        Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

      • It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
        Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
        Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

    • No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
      Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
      I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
      The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
      More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

      Reply

    • No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
      Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
      I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
      The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
      More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

      Reply

    • No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
      Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
      I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
      The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
      More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

      Reply

    • No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
      Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
      I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
      The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
      More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

      Reply

    • No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
      Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
      I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
      The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
      More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

      Reply

  3. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

  4. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

  5. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

  6. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

  7. First of all, ditch that rice cereal! It doesn’t have enough nutrients to balance out the room it takes up in his tummy. The AAP recommendation for breastfed babies is nothing but breastmilk for six months. Feeding him solids can actually have a negative impact on your supply, as they will make him nurse less, thus stimulating your supply less. I know some pediatricians still recommend solids at 4 months, but that information is outdated and geared towards formula-fed infants.
    He’s, what, four and a half months old? This is the time when your supply is changing from hormonally driven to supply and demand. It’s normal to see a decline in pumping output and to no longer feel full in your breasts any more.
    Some things you can do to help pumping output:
    1. Pump first thing in the morning. Your prolactin levels are highest then, so your output will be, too.
    2. Nurse Alden on the other side while pumping, especially in the morning. It will stimulate letdown.
    3. On the topic of letdown, that is actually the main issue women will see with pumping, not supply, so…
    a. Try a fennel supplement. It is very helpful for women who have to pump a plot, because fennel stimulates letdown. Mother’s Milk Tea (if you can stand licorice) has both fennel and fenugreek in it.
    b. Make sure you are pumping through a second let down. It’s the second let down that tells your body “make more milk NOW!” If you aren’t getting a second letdown, back to the fennel thing. It really does help.
    4. Be careful with the water. Dehydration can tank your supply, but overhydration can be detrimental as well. Drink to thirst, drink when you pump/nurse, but don’t over do it.
    5. If you’re getting your period back, you might see a temporary dip in supply/pumping output. This is normal and as long as you keep nursing/pumping on a regular schedule, you should see a return to normal within a day or so after your period starts.
    6. Some natural ways to increase supply include oatmeal (the slow-cooking, steel cut kind is best) and fenugreek (but only if you’ve tried the other things mentioned above) — when I was pumping milk for Ez, I started on fenugreek and fennel to make pumping a little easier. You’ll smell like you’ve been making sweet, sweet love to an IHOP, but it has a noticable impact on your output!
    7. Stress can impact your supply, but it’s usually less the stress and more how you’re reacting to the stressor itself. For example, some women claim holiday stress tanks their supply, but when they stop to look at their schedules, they really see the holiday rush is causing baby to nurse less often. Take a good look at your schedule and see if there’s any time of day where Alden might actually be nursing less than you think.
    Ok, did I lay too much info on you?

    Reply

  8. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

  9. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

    • Re: Thrush
      Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
      So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
      I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

      Reply

      • Re: Thrush
        Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
        If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

      • Re: Thrush
        I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

      • Re: Thrush
        I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
        If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

      • Re: Thrush
        I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
        If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

      • Re: Thrush
        I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
        If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

      • Re: Thrush
        I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
        If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

      • Re: Thrush
        I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
        If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

      • Re: Thrush
        I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
        If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

      • Re: Thrush
        I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

      • Re: Thrush
        I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

      • Re: Thrush
        I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

      • Re: Thrush
        I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

      • Re: Thrush
        I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

      • Re: Thrush
        Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
        If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

      • Re: Thrush
        Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
        If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

      • Re: Thrush
        Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
        If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

      • Re: Thrush
        Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
        If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

      • Re: Thrush
        Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
        If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

    • Re: Thrush
      Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
      So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
      I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

      Reply

    • Re: Thrush
      Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
      So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
      I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

      Reply

    • Re: Thrush
      Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
      So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
      I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

      Reply

    • Re: Thrush
      Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
      So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
      I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

      Reply

    • Re: Thrush
      Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
      So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
      I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

      Reply

  10. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

  11. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

  12. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

  13. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

  14. RE: Thrush
    I totally missed an opportunity to use this icon in my previous comment! Doh!
    Along with GV, which does work well (please make sure you’re getting 1% concentration, not 2%, which can cause chemical burn to sensitive areas), you could start taking a probiotic OR eating plain yogurt (either one works) and taking grapefruit seed extract (GSE) — be careful you don’t get grapefruit extract or grapeseed extract, it’s got to be grapefruit seed extract to work. It’s a natural antifungal/antibiotic, and while it tastes like the wrath of God, it works really well.
    If you suspect thrush, wash everything that comes into contact with your breasts in vinegar water. Boil all your pump parts and wash your nursing bras in super hot water with vinegar. The vinegar will kill the lingering yeasties. If you are treating yourself for thrush, treat Alden, too, because it can pass back and forth b/w mom and baby. Pain that wonderful purple GV stuff on your nipples and latch Alden on to nurse. You can put Lansinoh around his mouth to prevent facial staining, then wipe it off after you nurse. His lips/mouth will be purple, but it will keep his face from being grapetastic as well.

    Reply

  15. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

  16. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

    • That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
      ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

      Reply

    • That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
      ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

      Reply

    • That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
      ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

      Reply

    • That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
      ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

      Reply

    • That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
      ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

      Reply

    • That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
      ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

      Reply

    • Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
      My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

      Reply

      • I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

      • I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

      • I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

      • I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

      • I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

      • I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

      • Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

      • I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

      • I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

      • I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

      • I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

      • I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

      • I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

      • Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

      • Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

      • Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

      • Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

      • Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

    • Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
      My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

      Reply

    • Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
      My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

      Reply

    • Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
      My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

      Reply

    • Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
      My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

      Reply

    • Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
      My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

      Reply

  17. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

  18. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

  19. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

  20. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

  21. Ditch the cereal. The problem with it is that it fills him up with fewer calories than milk provides, so it can work against you.
    You may very well be about to start your period, because almost everybody has a supply drop then, and M’s right that this is when it shifts to supply and demand. Sprinkle brewer’s yeast on everything.
    It’ll work out. It will be okay.

    Reply

  22. That’s right, I totally forgot about brewer’s yeast! It’s tasty and really helps.
    ETA: Housepoet’s Famous Lactation Cookies are a delicious way to boost supply (and have an excuse to eat cookies).

    Reply

  23. No, not too much! I’m delighted. I knew you’d have some good information.
    Let me clarify on the rice cereal thing: I’m gone for about 9-10 hours a day and Damon gives him the cereal in the late morning. My hope was actually that he would drink a little bit less, since that’s when he’s eating from my stash. It may all be moot, since he only gets about 2TBS a day (rice and milk combined) and he’s eating more milk than ever. He’s five months tomorrow. I’d be delighted to hold out for another month on breast milk only. Do you think that little amount is a problem?
    I made a list of all the things you recommended and we’ll be hitting the neighborhood drugstore shortly. I think of myself as someone who likes and eats pretty much anything. Want to hear something funny? I don’t actually like tea, oatmeal, or licorice. But I do like feeding my son, so I’ll do it anyway. I do love IHOP!
    The letdown thing is what really put the fear in me. I was always getting a second letdown and then suddenly it stopped no matter how long I kept pumping.
    More thrush-specific questions on your other reply πŸ™‚

    Reply

  24. Re: Thrush
    Hilariously, I don’t like yogurt either. I’ll ask the pharmacist for a probiotic.
    So, thrush: It’s not a terrible pain. It’s an intermittent stinging that is definitely uncomfortable. No other evidence on me or baby. Does thrush sound like a good guess? I don’t want to go through all the rigorous cleaning if that’s not even the problem. Would I boil the parts after every use?
    I may be leaning toward a thrush diagnosis just because I think it would be funny to see him looking like he just finished a pie-eating contest.

    Reply

  25. I DO love cookies!

    Reply

  26. Thank you. I know you faced down much worse and it’s a comfort to hear you say it will work out.
    My cat loved brewer’s yeast, so it MUST be delicious!

    Reply

  27. It really does matter. Six months should be the bare minimum for starting solids, unless you have an unusual growth issue like Lynn and Ezra had (and they had the support of an unusually well-informed pediatrician), and when you do start solids, cereal isn’t the way to go. You’ll want higher nutrient foods like avocado or sweet potato, something that makes that room it’s taking up in his tummy worthwhile. I understand the temptation to stretch out a feeding with cereal, but it really can do more harm than good. Along with the issue of potentially impacting supply, early introduction of solids ups his risk for developing food allergies.
    Fennel will help with the letdown. Get a pill supplement so you don’t have to taste the licorice flavor. There are supply-boosting tinctures that can also help avoid having to drink a big cup of tea.
    Fenugreek will make everything that comes out of you smell like maple syrup, if you’re taking enough of it to up your supply. You will sweat, pee, lactate, and possibly bleed (haven’t checked that one) the aroma of maple syrup.

    Reply

  28. Re: Thrush
    Stinging/burning pain definitely sounds like thrush. Think of how it feels when you have a vaginal yeast infection (if you’ve had them) — the discomfort may be similar to the burning sensation you can get while urinating when you have a yeast infection.
    If you do have thrush, boiling the pump parts daily until you’re cleared of it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

    Reply

  29. Re: Thrush
    I guess ultimately the GV and the vinegar can’t hurt anything, so even if I’m wrong it’s no big deal. If I am right, how long would expect it to take to clear things up?

    Reply

  30. Okay, I’m sold. I’ll put the cereal away. I don’t think we’ll get beyond six months on just milk, considering his size. He’s huge, he eats a lot, and I’m gone for big chunks of time. But, today we can make it so today we will!

    Reply

  31. Re: Thrush
    I think I did a once-a-day GV treatment for 2 or 3 days in a row.
    If you’re having a lot of stinging in between, I’ve found a little bit of a vinegar wash on my nipples in between breastfeeding is really soothing.

    Reply

  32. That’s great to hear!
    Just remember that size doesn’t necessarily indicate readiness for solids; reaching a certain weight is just one of the indicators (others are loss of tongue thrust, ability to sit unassisted, ability to chew/gum food, development of pincer grasp to pick up food, and being six months of age). Kellymom has some great information on starting solids.
    You’ve seen what a porker Donovan was, but he just wouldn’t be bothered with solids until he was over eight months old. We never did spoon-feeding, just went straight to self-feeding, which is an excellent way to know if your kiddo is ready for solids. When it’s time, offer little tidbits of soft, nutritious food (many breastfeeding mamas do swear by avocado, if you don’t have a history of allergies to them, but sweet potato or even banana are good choices) and if he’s ready to eat them, he’ll be able to plunk them into his mouth and gum/chew them up. You may end up with an Ezra, who will gnaw your hand off to get to what you’ve got, or you may end up with a Donovan, who was a laissez faire eater until one day he decided there might be something to this food thing. πŸ˜‰

    Reply

  33. We started with banana and sweet potato. When he was about 8 months we added yogurt, which was a major hit. The only time we used cereal was to add baby oatmeal to things as a thickener because he preferred a heartier texture than the liquified food.

    Reply

  34. We shall see which way he goes. But I’m going to guess that I have an Ezra on my hands based on:
    1. His stalker-like staring whenever I eat
    2. His swiping and smacking at my plate and/or fork
    3. (My favorite) When he watches me chew something he works his mouth like a marionette.
    That last one never fails to make me laugh.

    Reply

  35. Donovan loves yogurt as well. We held off for a while due to Liam’s dairy allergy, but when it was pretty clear that Donovan didn’t share that allergy, I just let him go nuts with it.

    Reply

  36. Not really relevant to this, but regarding our issues: a friend of mine yesterday was talking about HER friend whose son had the same problem as Ezra. He was two weeks early, like Big Ez, and wouldn’t grow. She was panicked too, and wound up taking him all the way to the Mayo Clinic. After exhaustive testing, they told her that they call it “catch-up syndrome,” which is something that is idiopathic and occasionally happens, mostly to boys. There’s no underlying cause, but their systems for some reason aren’t really ready to get going, so they don’t grow. They’re sort of hibernating, and when they do suddenly start to grow it goes quickly and they catch up to other babies their age.

    Reply

  37. Interesting. I wonder if there are factors from the pregnancy, or if its a genetic thing, or what?

    Reply

  38. I eat it on popcorn and it’s delish.

    Reply

  39. Alden might also be an enthusiastic eater once he does start solids, but one who still nurses. Ez eats just about everything, but he still nurses a lot. I did relax more once he started gaining weight and eating other stuff, honestly. Although our issues were not caused by anything in particular, it was a relief to me when I could quantify how much other stuff he was eating, too. To this day he loves a banana more than anything except pizza and his most beloved contraband, chocolate.

    Reply

  40. One doctor I spoke to when Jonas was in the NICU told me that they call it “goofy white boy syndrome” and her son did it too. He was also just a bit early. That’s the only noticeable link I’ve noticed, but it isn’t like I’ve done an exhaustive study.

    Reply

  41. I’m really looking forward to expanding his diet. I think it will be a lot of fun. Last night I had to practically arm wrestle him for my salad. But I really hope he continues to love nursing. Right now we both enjoy it so much.

    Reply

  42. While this definitely isn’t Alden’s story, I still think he has “goofy white boy syndrome.” Because he is definitely all of those things.

    Reply

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