Practical Question

Okay owners and knowers of babies…

Alden has started to cruise. He’s doing great. But he’s leaving behind a few crucial developmental milestones. It’s weird. He’s not stalling there. He just seems to be skipping them. I don’t mean crawling. He’s clearly not going to crawl. He scoots on his behind. Which I think is the source of one of his problems. Instead of approaching vertical surfaces on his hands and knees, he scoots right up to them. So when he arrives, instead of being in prime pulling up position, he’s sitting with his legs flat on the floor, knees bent, bottoms of his feet pressed together. Can you picture? So when he tries to pull up he’s using only his arm strength because his feet are not flat on the floor. When he gets enough oomph going he pushes up on the sides of his feet and then straightens them out once he’s fully standing. It’s not easy and I’m amazed that he hits it about one third of the time. How do babies normally pull up from the sitting position? I’m trying to help him, but I don’t know SOP.

Same thing for my other question. He can’t sit up from a prone position. At all. He just lays there straining and trying to do a straight sit up. Considering that his head is roughly 90% of his body weight, that is not going to work even once. I try to roll him on his side and get him to push up with one hand, but usually as soon as I get within arms’ length he grabs at me like he’s drowning and hauls himself upright that way. It works, but I’m afraid he’s going to be in college and I’m going to have to go to his dorm every morning to let him grab my arms so he can get up out of bed. How do babies normally get from lying down to sitting? Do they start on their bellies and then push up to knees? This seems most promising to me and he’s adept at flipping from sitting on his knees to getting onto his bottom. But that is quite a few steps, from lying on his back to getting upright on his knees.

In continuing real estate excitement, our house inspection is tomorrow.

This is the living room:

They’re really good decorators.

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24 responses to this post.

  1. UP!!
    Ha! The question of how to get up and down places is also plaguing us, but Bonzo has gotten to the point where he really wants to CLIMB, which is a whole other level of fun.
    Both the pulling up and sitting up maneuvers really depend on resting weight on one knee, I’m sorry to say. So until he figures out how to use his knees, he might be one pretty frustrated baby. I didn’t believe it until Bonzo started doing it, but they have to be on their stomachs, bend at the waist, and “walk” their hands towards their butt to get into a sitting position. It was an elaborate process the first couple weeks, though now it’s so fluid you would never know what’s going on. Alden will eventually hit on this one way or another, but it sounds like he’s going to be miserable for a little while first.
    Everybody blames the “back to sleep” campaign for the thousands of babies who don’t crawl, but I think crawling and kneeling are inherently tough skills to learn because for lots of babies it’s really DIY locomotion. Who ever watches an adult crawl around, or walk on their knees across a room? It’s no wonder they’re all kind of idiosyncratic at first. (I may be over-proud of my son’s picture-perfect crawling skills–almost the platonic ideal of a crawl! It’s amazing!–just because little dude still shows no interest whatsoever in walking independently.)

    Reply

  2. UP!!
    Ha! The question of how to get up and down places is also plaguing us, but Bonzo has gotten to the point where he really wants to CLIMB, which is a whole other level of fun.
    Both the pulling up and sitting up maneuvers really depend on resting weight on one knee, I’m sorry to say. So until he figures out how to use his knees, he might be one pretty frustrated baby. I didn’t believe it until Bonzo started doing it, but they have to be on their stomachs, bend at the waist, and “walk” their hands towards their butt to get into a sitting position. It was an elaborate process the first couple weeks, though now it’s so fluid you would never know what’s going on. Alden will eventually hit on this one way or another, but it sounds like he’s going to be miserable for a little while first.
    Everybody blames the “back to sleep” campaign for the thousands of babies who don’t crawl, but I think crawling and kneeling are inherently tough skills to learn because for lots of babies it’s really DIY locomotion. Who ever watches an adult crawl around, or walk on their knees across a room? It’s no wonder they’re all kind of idiosyncratic at first. (I may be over-proud of my son’s picture-perfect crawling skills–almost the platonic ideal of a crawl! It’s amazing!–just because little dude still shows no interest whatsoever in walking independently.)

    Reply

    • Re: UP!!
      The one knee thing! Very valuable to know. We’ve already begun trying to show him how he can shift his weight. I think you’re right that we’re (or more to the point, he’ll) have to be patient because it is never his inclination to be on his belly.
      I’ve heard that stellar crawlers will walk later. That makes perfect sense to me. It’s economy of learning. Effective form of locomotion? Check! On to the pincer grasp or object permanence or first words or whatever.
      Even if this is a side effect of Back to Sleep, it’s fine with me. Keeping him breathing is higher on my list of priorities than just about anything else, so I’ll deal with any side effects. I know the chances of SIDS are tiny. I’d like them to be even tinier if possible. That’s also the reason Alden has slept with a pacifier pretty much since he was born.

      Reply

    • Re: UP!!
      The one knee thing! Very valuable to know. We’ve already begun trying to show him how he can shift his weight. I think you’re right that we’re (or more to the point, he’ll) have to be patient because it is never his inclination to be on his belly.
      I’ve heard that stellar crawlers will walk later. That makes perfect sense to me. It’s economy of learning. Effective form of locomotion? Check! On to the pincer grasp or object permanence or first words or whatever.
      Even if this is a side effect of Back to Sleep, it’s fine with me. Keeping him breathing is higher on my list of priorities than just about anything else, so I’ll deal with any side effects. I know the chances of SIDS are tiny. I’d like them to be even tinier if possible. That’s also the reason Alden has slept with a pacifier pretty much since he was born.

      Reply

  3. UP!!
    Ha! The question of how to get up and down places is also plaguing us, but Bonzo has gotten to the point where he really wants to CLIMB, which is a whole other level of fun.
    Both the pulling up and sitting up maneuvers really depend on resting weight on one knee, I’m sorry to say. So until he figures out how to use his knees, he might be one pretty frustrated baby. I didn’t believe it until Bonzo started doing it, but they have to be on their stomachs, bend at the waist, and “walk” their hands towards their butt to get into a sitting position. It was an elaborate process the first couple weeks, though now it’s so fluid you would never know what’s going on. Alden will eventually hit on this one way or another, but it sounds like he’s going to be miserable for a little while first.
    Everybody blames the “back to sleep” campaign for the thousands of babies who don’t crawl, but I think crawling and kneeling are inherently tough skills to learn because for lots of babies it’s really DIY locomotion. Who ever watches an adult crawl around, or walk on their knees across a room? It’s no wonder they’re all kind of idiosyncratic at first. (I may be over-proud of my son’s picture-perfect crawling skills–almost the platonic ideal of a crawl! It’s amazing!–just because little dude still shows no interest whatsoever in walking independently.)

    Reply

  4. UP!!
    Ha! The question of how to get up and down places is also plaguing us, but Bonzo has gotten to the point where he really wants to CLIMB, which is a whole other level of fun.
    Both the pulling up and sitting up maneuvers really depend on resting weight on one knee, I’m sorry to say. So until he figures out how to use his knees, he might be one pretty frustrated baby. I didn’t believe it until Bonzo started doing it, but they have to be on their stomachs, bend at the waist, and “walk” their hands towards their butt to get into a sitting position. It was an elaborate process the first couple weeks, though now it’s so fluid you would never know what’s going on. Alden will eventually hit on this one way or another, but it sounds like he’s going to be miserable for a little while first.
    Everybody blames the “back to sleep” campaign for the thousands of babies who don’t crawl, but I think crawling and kneeling are inherently tough skills to learn because for lots of babies it’s really DIY locomotion. Who ever watches an adult crawl around, or walk on their knees across a room? It’s no wonder they’re all kind of idiosyncratic at first. (I may be over-proud of my son’s picture-perfect crawling skills–almost the platonic ideal of a crawl! It’s amazing!–just because little dude still shows no interest whatsoever in walking independently.)

    Reply

  5. You have to have one of those little crane things. You didn’t get one of those at your baby shower?
    You might try rolling him over and showing him his knees, but I wouldn’t help him overmuch after that, or at least every time. He’ll get it pretty quickly after he sees that he has to bend his knees. Once he understands simple levers, he’ll be off to the races.

    Reply

  6. You have to have one of those little crane things. You didn’t get one of those at your baby shower?
    You might try rolling him over and showing him his knees, but I wouldn’t help him overmuch after that, or at least every time. He’ll get it pretty quickly after he sees that he has to bend his knees. Once he understands simple levers, he’ll be off to the races.

    Reply

  7. You have to have one of those little crane things. You didn’t get one of those at your baby shower?
    You might try rolling him over and showing him his knees, but I wouldn’t help him overmuch after that, or at least every time. He’ll get it pretty quickly after he sees that he has to bend his knees. Once he understands simple levers, he’ll be off to the races.

    Reply

  8. You have to have one of those little crane things. You didn’t get one of those at your baby shower?
    You might try rolling him over and showing him his knees, but I wouldn’t help him overmuch after that, or at least every time. He’ll get it pretty quickly after he sees that he has to bend his knees. Once he understands simple levers, he’ll be off to the races.

    Reply

  9. I watched a program when I was pregnant with Monster that explained that parents always watch for classic crawling and worry if the kid doesn’t do it, but there are about 10 different recognized locomotion methods among babies, and all of them are developmentally relevant. Scooting is one. Crawling does help with patterning and left-right coordination, so as he gets older incorporate crawling into games (through a tunnel, for example). Anya wouldn’t crawl at all for ages. She’d walk up to a tunnel and squat there looking though it, but she wouldn’t consider crawling until she was about 15 months and I was crawling around picking up things on the floor. She thought it was hilarious and crawled with me.
    Since he isn’t doing a classic crawl, you can’t watch for him to do the classic pulling-up methods. He’ll find a way that works with his methods. MOst of them crawl up to something, go up on their knees and grab on, then put one foot flat and move the other flat while they’re pushing up.
    Most of them learn to sit from a lying position by rolling onto their sides and pushing up with one or both arms. When you’re playing, see if you can roll him a bit onto his side and see what he does.
    Milestones are a way of making sure nothing is wrong, but they aren’t absolute.

    Reply

  10. I watched a program when I was pregnant with Monster that explained that parents always watch for classic crawling and worry if the kid doesn’t do it, but there are about 10 different recognized locomotion methods among babies, and all of them are developmentally relevant. Scooting is one. Crawling does help with patterning and left-right coordination, so as he gets older incorporate crawling into games (through a tunnel, for example). Anya wouldn’t crawl at all for ages. She’d walk up to a tunnel and squat there looking though it, but she wouldn’t consider crawling until she was about 15 months and I was crawling around picking up things on the floor. She thought it was hilarious and crawled with me.
    Since he isn’t doing a classic crawl, you can’t watch for him to do the classic pulling-up methods. He’ll find a way that works with his methods. MOst of them crawl up to something, go up on their knees and grab on, then put one foot flat and move the other flat while they’re pushing up.
    Most of them learn to sit from a lying position by rolling onto their sides and pushing up with one or both arms. When you’re playing, see if you can roll him a bit onto his side and see what he does.
    Milestones are a way of making sure nothing is wrong, but they aren’t absolute.

    Reply

    • Very reassuring, thank you. I’m trying your rolling suggestion. Mostly he reacts by frantically flailing and signaling with his eyes, “Help! Help! I’m going over on my stomach! And then I will be on my stomach! And the world will spin off its axis and there will be no more mashed tofu for me ever!” And if he does go over onto his stomach he flips back fast as a fish. But, as I find this hilarious, odds are I’ll keep trying.

      Reply

    • Very reassuring, thank you. I’m trying your rolling suggestion. Mostly he reacts by frantically flailing and signaling with his eyes, “Help! Help! I’m going over on my stomach! And then I will be on my stomach! And the world will spin off its axis and there will be no more mashed tofu for me ever!” And if he does go over onto his stomach he flips back fast as a fish. But, as I find this hilarious, odds are I’ll keep trying.

      Reply

  11. I watched a program when I was pregnant with Monster that explained that parents always watch for classic crawling and worry if the kid doesn’t do it, but there are about 10 different recognized locomotion methods among babies, and all of them are developmentally relevant. Scooting is one. Crawling does help with patterning and left-right coordination, so as he gets older incorporate crawling into games (through a tunnel, for example). Anya wouldn’t crawl at all for ages. She’d walk up to a tunnel and squat there looking though it, but she wouldn’t consider crawling until she was about 15 months and I was crawling around picking up things on the floor. She thought it was hilarious and crawled with me.
    Since he isn’t doing a classic crawl, you can’t watch for him to do the classic pulling-up methods. He’ll find a way that works with his methods. MOst of them crawl up to something, go up on their knees and grab on, then put one foot flat and move the other flat while they’re pushing up.
    Most of them learn to sit from a lying position by rolling onto their sides and pushing up with one or both arms. When you’re playing, see if you can roll him a bit onto his side and see what he does.
    Milestones are a way of making sure nothing is wrong, but they aren’t absolute.

    Reply

  12. I watched a program when I was pregnant with Monster that explained that parents always watch for classic crawling and worry if the kid doesn’t do it, but there are about 10 different recognized locomotion methods among babies, and all of them are developmentally relevant. Scooting is one. Crawling does help with patterning and left-right coordination, so as he gets older incorporate crawling into games (through a tunnel, for example). Anya wouldn’t crawl at all for ages. She’d walk up to a tunnel and squat there looking though it, but she wouldn’t consider crawling until she was about 15 months and I was crawling around picking up things on the floor. She thought it was hilarious and crawled with me.
    Since he isn’t doing a classic crawl, you can’t watch for him to do the classic pulling-up methods. He’ll find a way that works with his methods. MOst of them crawl up to something, go up on their knees and grab on, then put one foot flat and move the other flat while they’re pushing up.
    Most of them learn to sit from a lying position by rolling onto their sides and pushing up with one or both arms. When you’re playing, see if you can roll him a bit onto his side and see what he does.
    Milestones are a way of making sure nothing is wrong, but they aren’t absolute.

    Reply

  13. Re: UP!!
    The one knee thing! Very valuable to know. We’ve already begun trying to show him how he can shift his weight. I think you’re right that we’re (or more to the point, he’ll) have to be patient because it is never his inclination to be on his belly.
    I’ve heard that stellar crawlers will walk later. That makes perfect sense to me. It’s economy of learning. Effective form of locomotion? Check! On to the pincer grasp or object permanence or first words or whatever.
    Even if this is a side effect of Back to Sleep, it’s fine with me. Keeping him breathing is higher on my list of priorities than just about anything else, so I’ll deal with any side effects. I know the chances of SIDS are tiny. I’d like them to be even tinier if possible. That’s also the reason Alden has slept with a pacifier pretty much since he was born.

    Reply

  14. I knew something was missing from my baby shower. I just thought it was tequila.

    Reply

  15. Very reassuring, thank you. I’m trying your rolling suggestion. Mostly he reacts by frantically flailing and signaling with his eyes, “Help! Help! I’m going over on my stomach! And then I will be on my stomach! And the world will spin off its axis and there will be no more mashed tofu for me ever!” And if he does go over onto his stomach he flips back fast as a fish. But, as I find this hilarious, odds are I’ll keep trying.

    Reply

  16. Posted by Anonymous on September 10, 2008 at 12:27 am

    Hee! Well, at least he’s good-natured.

    Reply

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